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"THESE CULTS"

An Analysis of the Foibles of Dr. Morris Fishbein's "Medical
Follies" and an Indictment of Medical Practice in General,
with a Non-Partisan Presentation of the Case for the
Drugless Schools of Healing, Comprising Essays
on Homeopathy, Osteopathy, Chiropractic,
The Abrams Method, Vivisection, Physical
Culture, Christian Science, Medical
Publicity, The Cost of Hospital-
ization and State Medicine.

BY

ANNIE RILEY HALE

AUTHOR OF "ROOSEVELTEAN FACT AND FABLE," "THE NATURAL WAY TO HEALTH," ETC.

Reproduced 1964
by Photolithography
ROYAL LEE Box 267 - Elm Grove, Wis.


NEW YORK|
National Health Foundation
FORTY-SEVENTH FLOOR, WOOLWORTH BUILDING
1926

COPYRIGHT, 1926, BY
NATIONAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES

DEDICATED
TO THE
FRIENDS OF MEDICAL FREEDOM EVERYWHERE
INCLUDING CERTAIN MEMBERS OF
THE MEDICAL PROFESSION

 

FOREWORD

    "THESE CULTS" is not primarily a defense of drugless therapies except insofar as a true statement of facts—correcting misstatements—may constitute a defense. Its author is not aligned with any school of healing, and writes only as an independent research worker in every field.

    The phenomenal growth of some of these Cults in recent years has brought them prominently to the fore, while the "investigations" directed against them by the "Regulars" have still further stimulated popular curiosity concerning them. The Frothing-ham "investigating" committee of Boston in 1922, and the more recently published "Medical Follies" by Dr. Morris Fishbein, of Chicago, if they did not altogether achieve their double purpose of discrediting the Cults and glorifying Orthodox Medicine, at least served to focus public attention on the newer therapies.

    And seeing that the public's information about these had all come from interested sources—either from the Cults themselves or from their professional adversaries—the time seemed ripe for a non-partisan presentation of the case for the drugless schools. To meet such need this volume is tentatively put forward by the author, in the hope that the facts presented may stimulate further investigation and arouse further interest in a subject vitally bound up not only with the drugless schools, but with the health and well-being of the whole community—the subject of medical freedom.

   Incidentally, "These Cults" is a reply to "The Medical Follies," in that it essays to check up some of the Fishbein inaccuracies—not all of them.

    To the extent that a comparison of statistical records proves the superiority of drugless methods over medical procedure in the care of the sick, the book may be called an indictment of medical practice. Such indictment is predicated on medical records and medical authorities, the author calling to her support the testimony of many eminent physicians of the "regular" school. She feels there is much to be said for the private practitioner, whether "regular" or "irregular." For those who want him he serves a real need. But the choice of him should be entirely a matter of individual discretion. Each individual should be free to apply to any school or to none of them, in his search for health. The custom of backing any therapeutic system with the government and arming it with police power to force its nostrums on an unwilling public, such as is now permitted in the medical domination of public health service, is absolutely vicious and indefensible from any standpoint.

    "These Cults" is an emphatic protest against State Medicine and if it shall serve no other purpose than to arouse in its readers the average person's love of fair play, it will not have been written in vain.

THE AUTHOR.       

 

CONTENTS

CHAPTER

FOREWORD

I. "UP AND AT 'EM, REGULARS!"

II. THE FISHBEIN "FOLLIES"

III. THE CREED OF HAHNEMANN

IV. THE MANIPULATIVE CULTS: OSTEOPATHY

V. WHAT IS CHIROPRACTIC?

VI. ABRAMS EXPLAINS. THE ERA

VII. THE ANTI-CULTS: THE GUINEA PIG

VIII. PHYSICAL CULTURE: "CAPITALIZING THE          EROTIC"

IX. COUÉ AND MRS. EDDY

X. THE MEDICAL PUBLICITY MACHINE

XI. THE COST OF HOSPITALIZATION IN AMERICA.       WHY HENRY FORD'S IDEA WAS NOT
      PRACTICABLE

XII. WHY STATE MEDICINE?